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HALL OF SHAME
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 HALL OF SHAME OBJECTIVES
1. Potential to embarass the student
2. Elimination activities
3. Over emphahsis on having fun
4. Lack of emphahsis in teaching motor skills and lifetime activity
5. Low participation time factors
6. Dangerous injury or harm to students
 
HALL OF SHAME P.E. EXCUSES
My son is under a doctor's care and should not take P.E. today. Please execute him
 
Please excuse Lisa for being absent. She was sick and I had her shot.
Dear School: Excuses
Please ekscuse John being absent on Jan. 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, and also 33.
Please excuse Gloria from Jim today. She is administrating
 
Please excuse Roland from P.E. for a few days. Yesterday he fell out of a tree and misplaced his hip
 
Carlos was absent yesterday because he was playing football. He was hurt in the growing part
 
Please excuse Ray Friday from school. He has very loose vowels.
 
Please excuse Tommy for being absent yesterday. He had diarrhea and his boots leak.

 Please excuse Jimmy for being. It was his father's fault.

My son Michael won't be in school today, he caught his thing in his zipper this morning while dressing and is in lot of pain!

Please excuse Casey from school. It was Take Your Daughter to work day. I don't have a job, so I made her stay home and do housework.

 Please excuse John for not being in school yesterday. He had diarrhea - the ?????.

AND OF COURSE , DODGEBALL

OH , yes, PE TEACHERS , STUDENTS AND PARENTS PLAY IT NOW !

Click Below

 



 

 


 
 

Thanks to Neil Williams and PE Central for the Hall of Shame •Dodgeball (Inducted: 1992): The all-time classic! The main objective is to attempt to inflict pain, harm, injury, and embarrassment on one’s opponents, and have a good laugh doing it. Is this the worst PE game ever?
•Duck, Duck, Goose (Inducted: 1992): A game of minimal participation; the chosen “goose” attempts to get up from a sitting position and try to catch the “ducker” who only has to go about 60 feet and already has a full running head start. Everyone else just sits and screams at ear-shattering pitch and decibel levels.
•Giants, Elves, and Wizards (Inducted: 1992): An updated version of the already bad “Crows and Cranes.” Participation time is at a bare minimum, the rules take forever to explain, and even then, students are still confused. The game usually ends when two students crash heads together.
•Kickball (Inducted: 1992): A game students can organize and play quite well all by themselves as early as second grade. Combine that with minimal activity for 90% of the students, the potential for embarrassment when a batter misses the rolling ball, and the opportunity to get players “out” by hitting them as hard as possible with a thrown ball. Is this why we went to college?
•Musical Chairs (Inducted: 1992): A classic “elimination” game in which the least skilled and least attentive students are immediately eliminated and then sent to improve their abilities by sitting on the floor, spinning mindlessly in circles on their “glutes,” and waiting 15 minutes for the winner (almost always the same kid) to be determined.
•Relay Races (Inducted: 1992): An eight-minute activity in which a student gets one 20-second chance to “go,” and either succeed or fail in front of classmates’ eagerly watchful eyes. Successes are generally ignored, but failures are fodder for continuing ridicule at least through dismissal at the end of the day.
•Steal the Bacon (Inducted: 1992): A sideline game in which two opposing players come out to the center of the court and compete against each other in front of the entire class. Any activity with this potential for embarrassment and absolutely minimal activity time easily qualifies as terrible.
1994:
•Line Soccer (Inducted: 1994): A more dangerous version of Steal the Bacon. This is another sideline game where two opposing players compete in front of the entire class with the final glory being the opportunity to kick a soccer ball as hard as possible directly at the head, stomach, or other body part of a member of the defending line. Siblings Line Basketball and Line Hockey also qualify as HOS members on the basis of close family resemblance.
•Messy Backyard (Inducted: 1994): A misbegotten and mindless creation where students on opposing teams frantically throw objects over a barrier into the other team’s court until the whistle is blown. Then the objects are counted and a winner is determined. Factor in students’ inabilities to count so many objects, the ignored stop signal, blind luck and the inevitable piercing screams of young children and you have one of our worst games of all time.
•Red Rover (Inducted: 1994)
: Who’s the toughest kid in class? We’re about to find out as players run, one at a time, and attempt to crash through the opposing team on the other side of a basketball court. This game is a relic from a time when football and wrestling coaches taught PE to occupy their time during the day and we apparently did not care at all about the safety of our students.
•Simon Says (Inducted: 1994): Another elimination game like Musical Chairs and Tag, but this has an important element missing from the other two: gleeful teacher deception. This has all the other problems inherent with elimination games too: removal of unskilled or inattentive students, singling out participants for ridicule, and low participation time. But the icing on the cake is the delight teachers take in deceiving, entrapping, and then punishing students when they are caught. What fun!
•Spud (Inducted: 1994): A first-cousin of dodgeball, it is another human target bombardment game where students try to hit, hurt and humiliate other classmates with a thrown object. At least in dodgeball, students have a chance to feint, dodge, and try to avoid being hit. In this classic game, students are told to “freeze” and then just have to stand there and hope they don’t get hit in the teeth.
•Tag (Inducted: 1994): In its evil form, tag is another self-defeating elimination game in which slow and unskilled players who are caught (tagged) must leave the activity and wait for the fastest and best players to finish up. When the next round of the game is played, those very same players who were tagged early on will be caught first again. Unlike many other HOS games, tag has some positive attributes and a creative teacher can fix the problems.
Inducted Inappropriate Teaching Practices (Click here to get the current Inappropriate Practices Documents from NASPE)
1996:
•Students on Display (Inducted: 1996): a first cousin of One Line, One Ball. This happens when one student performs a routine, skill, or test while everyone else gets to sit and watch. It can be fine for the most talented and confident, but devastating to the fragile self-image of low- and middle-level performers. And it’s an incredible waste of valuable class time.
•One line, one ball, one chance (Inducted: 1996): this usually happens with large classes and limited equipment and facilities: perhaps 15 students line up to shoot a ball, climb a rope, or attempt a skill. Practice time is virtually non-existent and long lines put pressure on each performer to do it right every time because chances are few and far in between.
•Roll out the ball (Inducted: 1996): this basically implies no planning, no teaching skill, no organization, no curriculum, no goals, no objectives… and no value. We’ve got an important job and we get paid reasonably well to do it. Is this the best we’ve got?
•Inappropriately sized equipment (Inducted: 1996): Only the varsity players need to use a full-sized basketball, soccer ball, or volleyball, so why do we insist on using this equipment to teach fifth graders? If only one student in our school is the high school quarterback, let’s at least teach the football unit with a junior-size ball that everyone can throw.
•Exercise as punishment (Inducted: 1996): If one purpose of our physical education programs is to promote positive attitudes towards lifetime physical activity, using exercise to punish or discipline students is certainly counterproductive. Short of total humiliation in front of the class, we can probably do nothing that will alienate students more quickly than having them run laps or do extra push-ups.
•Student captains choose teams (Inducted: 1996): this practice turns our students loose on one another to humiliate, embarrass, degrade, scar, and damage classmates in front of their peers. There’s no need to subject our students to this teacher-sanctioned psychological torture. Let’s leave the formation of student teams and groups to the people best qualified to do the job—the teachers.
•PE Class as Sports Camp (Inducted: 1996): The rationale driving many schools’ physical education programs today is still rooted in the premise that p.e. class is the place where future varsity athletes are born. But since most adults rarely, if ever, participate again in varsity-type sport after they have left high school, we need to focus on the activities our students will actually do later in life: individual pursuits with a recreational and lifetime fitness core: walking, running, swimming, adventure, biking, weight lifting, tennis, golf. Wrestling? Not too likely.
2011:
•All Star Lines (Inducted: October, 2011): In a full-class sports game with two teams, each team consists of two lines or sub-groups, and those lines alternate off and on at regular intervals. With only a few minutes remaining in the class, and the outcome in doubt, the teacher announces that it is time for each team to put out their "All Star Line". In a nasty twist on the practices of “Student Captains Choose Teams”, and “PE Class as Sports Camp” each team is told to determine who are the "All Stars" and who gets to sit and watch.

DODGEBALL GAME