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GER'S TIPS AND UPDATES

The Heimlich maneuver is a series of abdominal thrusts designed to create an artificial cough, which forces the foreign object out of the airway.
Performing the Heimlich maneuver on an older child, adolescent, or adult
   Stand behind the victim and locate the bottom rib with your hand.
   Move your hand across the abdomen to the area above the navel and make a fist. Keep the thumb side of your fist on the victim's abdomen.
   Place your other hand over your fist and press into the victim's stomach with a quick upward thrust until the foreign object is dislodged. Adjust the force of your thrust according to the victim's physique. A heavyset 60-year-old needs a firmer thrust than a slender 15-year-old or a 6-year-old child would need.
   Have someone call 911 after you begin the Heimlich maneuver or if the victim has lost consciousness. Continue performing the Heimlich maneuver until the object is dislodged. If the victim stops breathing, loses a heartbeat, and becomes unresponsive, begin cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) immediately until help arrives.
Do not perform the Heimlich maneuver on a baby if the baby can breathe, cry or make a normal voice sound, and cough strongly. If the baby cannot, there may be a serious airway blockage. Do not attempt to retrieve the object blocking the airway unless it is visible in the mouth. If so, sweep the object out with your finger. By attempting to retrieve an object that is not visible, you risk pushing it farther down the victim's windpipe. Have someone call 911 while you begin the Heimlich maneuver.
Performing the Heimlich maneuver on a child under the age of one
   Hold the baby face down in your forearm. Extend your forearm out in front of you, making sure the baby's head is lower than the feet.
   With the palm of your other hand, hit the baby's back, gently but firmly, five times between the shoulder blades.
   Turn the baby face up in your arm and perform five chest thrusts, using the third and fourth fingers of your other hand. Repeat steps 2 and 3 until the object is expelled.
   If the baby becomes unresponsive, stops breathing, or loses a heartbeat, begin infant CPR until help arrives.
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Teenagers have a reputation for bad eating habits. They go overboard with junk foods, fast foods, follow fad diets, skip meals, and don’t get
enough of the nutrient-rich foods their growing bodies need. Nutritionists say such extreme eating habits can be extremely dangerous.
A recent Youth Risk Behavior Survey by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) concluded that teens’ unhealthy dietary habits, along with smoking, alcohol and drug use and risky sexual practices, put them at risk for diseases, like cancer, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease, later on in life. Teens’ extreme eating habits – which have also been labeled disordered and dysfunctional – can lead to serious health problems, even death, experts say.
Ironically, the nutrients that teenagers need the most in those peak growth years they don’t get, says Sheila Kelly, a clinical dietitian at Providence Hospital in Washington, DC, who writes a monthly nutrition column for healthAtoZ Professional.
"In general, a teenager’s diet is very low in vitamins and minerals,’’ says Kelly. In particular, teenagers lack calcium, iron and zinc. Parents can’t always control what their teens eat, she states, but they can influence the way they eat (see tips below).
Kelly says peer pressure, on-the-go lifestyles, and dual-working parents who rely heavily on convenience foods, contribute to teens’ poor eating habits. The media also has an influence, she says.
According to a study that appeared in the Journal of Nutrition Education (Vol. 9, 1977), children see over 100,000 food commercials on TV by the time they are adolescents, and many of those commercials are mainly for high fat and high sugar foods, Kelly says.
In between the Big Mac and Pepsi pitches, teens – girls in particular - also fall prey to Madison Avenue’s message that there’s no such thing as being too rich or too thin, according to nutritionist Frances Berg, who is editor of the Healthy Weight Journal and author of "Afraid to Eat: Children and Teens in Weight Crisis.’’
In a study of 1,000 suburban girls, Berg found that more than half of the 14-year-old girls in the study had already been on one weight loss diet. In another study, 30 to 436 percent of 9-year-old girls and 46 to 81 percent of 10-year-old girls in California were no longer eating normally because of fear of fat.
"They drink too much diet soda. They don’t get enough calcium, which effects them later on in life, and they obsess about food intake,’’ Kelly says of many teenage girls’ diet.
U.S. Department of Agriculture surveys show that roughly 9 out of 10 girls and nearly 7 out of 10 boys, ages 12 to 19, are not getting the recommended amount of calcium needed for strong bones. Peak bone growing is up to age 18, according to Kelly. The National Academy of Sciences recommends that teens and children ages 9 to 19 consume 1,300 mg of calcium per day – the equivalent of four serving so dairy products.
Teenagers who don’t get enough calcium can make things worse drinking copious amounts of diet soda, which leaches calcium from the bones, according to Kelly.
Kelly says teenagers also tend to avoid fruits and vegetables, which are great sources of disease-preventing pytochemicals. A CDC National Risk Behavior Survey in 1997 found that just over 29 percent of students surveyed had eaten the recommended five or more servings of fruits and vegetables during the day preceding the survey.
So what are worried parents to do? Kelly offers these five tips for helping coax a teenager to the table or to help detour potential eating problems before their child hits the teen years:
Encourage good eating habits and introduce a wide body of nutritious foods at an early age. Introduce a wide variety of foods to young children and avoid short-order cooking for picky toddlers.
Give adolescents a choice in foods rather than insist that what you’ve put in front of them is what they’re going to eat. Make the choices nutritious ones, though.
Limit TV watching. If your teenager is plopped in front of the television set for hours on end, that means he or she is not out exercising, which also helps build bone, is good for the heart, and is a healthy form of weight control.
Find innovative ways to include nutritious foods in their diet. For example, have calcium-fortified yogurt or puddings on hand for desserts. Or, serve soft-shell tacos made low-fat meat, and fat-free mozzarella cheese, and fresh mushrooms and peppers. "This way, it doesn’t make it seem like food is being shoved down their throats,’’ Kelly says.
Be a positive role model. Practice what you preach. If young people see their parents eating fruits and vegetables, they will too. Also, parents should avoid yo-yo dieting and other extreme eating behaviors themselves.
Teenagers have a reputation for bad eating habits. They go overboard with junk foods, fast foods, follow fad diets, skip meals, and don’t get
enough of the nutrient-rich foods their growing bodies need. Nutritionists say such extreme eating habits can be extremely dangerous.
A recent Youth Risk Behavior Survey by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) concluded that teens’ unhealthy dietary habits, along with smoking, alcohol and drug use and risky sexual practices, put them at risk for diseases, like cancer, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease, later on in life. Teens’ extreme eating habits – which have also been labeled disordered and dysfunctional – can lead to serious health problems, even death, experts say.
Ironically, the nutrients that teenagers need the most in those peak growth years they don’t get, says Sheila Kelly, a clinical dietitian at Providence Hospital in Washington, DC, who writes a monthly nutrition column for healthAtoZ Professional.
"In general, a teenager’s diet is very low in vitamins and minerals,’’ says Kelly. In particular, teenagers lack calcium, iron and zinc. Parents can’t always control what their teens eat, she states, but they can influence the way they eat (see tips below).
Kelly says peer pressure, on-the-go lifestyles, and dual-working parents who rely heavily on convenience foods, contribute to teens’ poor eating habits. The media also has an influence, she says.
According to a study that appeared in the Journal of Nutrition Education (Vol. 9, 1977), children see over 100,000 food commercials on TV by the time they are adolescents, and many of those commercials are mainly for high fat and high sugar foods, Kelly says.
In between the Big Mac and Pepsi pitches, teens – girls in particular - also fall prey to Madison Avenue’s message that there’s no such thing as being too rich or too thin, according to nutritionist Frances Berg, who is editor of the Healthy Weight Journal and author of "Afraid to Eat: Children and Teens in Weight Crisis.’’
In a study of 1,000 suburban girls, Berg found that more than half of the 14-year-old girls in the study had already been on one weight loss diet. In another study, 30 to 436 percent of 9-year-old girls and 46 to 81 percent of 10-year-old girls in California were no longer eating normally because of fear of fat.
"They drink too much diet soda. They don’t get enough calcium, which effects them later on in life, and they obsess about food intake,’’ Kelly says of many teenage girls’ diet.
U.S. Department of Agriculture surveys show that roughly 9 out of 10 girls and nearly 7 out of 10 boys, ages 12 to 19, are not getting the recommended amount of calcium needed for strong bones. Peak bone growing is up to age 18, according to Kelly. The National Academy of Sciences recommends that teens and children ages 9 to 19 consume 1,300 mg of calcium per day – the equivalent of four serving so dairy products.
Teenagers who don’t get enough calcium can make things worse drinking copious amounts of diet soda, which leaches calcium from the bones, according to Kelly.
Kelly says teenagers also tend to avoid fruits and vegetables, which are great sources of disease-preventing pytochemicals. A CDC National Risk Behavior Survey in 1997 found that just over 29 percent of students surveyed had eaten the recommended five or more servings of fruits and vegetables during the day preceding the survey.
So what are worried parents to do? Kelly offers these five tips for helping coax a teenager to the table or to help detour potential eating problems before their child hits the teen years:
STEP UP YOUR WALKING


If you want to pump up your walking, increasing your speed and climbing hills are not the only answers. A new generation of walking aids featuring weights and poles can help you burn more calories and improve your conditioning, research shows.
John Porcari, PhD, FACSM, a professor in the Department of Exercise and Sport Science at the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse, found that using walking poles increased the intensity of walking from 68 percent to 78 percent of maximal heart rate in a group of cardiac rehabilitation patients. In his study, people who used poles to exercise their arms as they walked – similar to cross-country skiers – burned an average of 45 more calories in a 30-minute walk.
"You can only walk so fast. By adding other devices, you can increase the intensity of your workout by 10-25 percent," Porcari said in a healthAtoZ interview. Other examples of walking adjuncts include hand weights, wrist weights, ankle weights, weighted gloves, weighted vests and belts with resistance cords.
Getting into the swing
Exercise walking is far different than a leisurely stroll, says John Acquaviva, PhD, healthAtoZ’s fitness expert and an assistant professor of health and physical education at Roanoke College in Virginia. If you’re looking to set a strong pace, try walking as fast as possible without breaking into a jog, he says.
"Is it tiring? – that’s a good gauge to go by. It should definitely feel tiring after 2-3 minutes. If your arms are not propelling you forward, it’s not a sufficient pace to get a workout," Acquaviva says.
Swinging your arms forward is one of the best ways to increase your workout without equipment, Porcari says. Adding hand weights, wrist weights or weighted gloves can moderately boost the intensity of your workout, but these devices are only beneficial if your arms are moving, according to Porcari’s study, published in the January/February 1999 issue of the American College of Sport Medicine’s Health and Fitness Journal.
Hand weights over three pounds are not recommended because too much weight can strain your arm and shoulder muscles, Porcari says. Also, be cautious of using hand weights – or walking poles – if you have hypertension, because the gripping action can raise your blood pressure, says Porcari, who is executive director of the university’s La Crosse Exercise and Health Program.
You won’t get bigger muscles from moving your arms, even if you carry weights, but you will see a difference in muscular endurance – your ability to do repeated movements without undue stress or fatigue, Porcari says.
What works, and what doesn’t
In his work with cardiac patients, Porcari has found that walking poles are the most effective and popular way to boost the benefits of walking. The poles provide a more intense workout than weights, and since they act like a cane, there’s less strain on your ankles, knees and hips, Porcari says.
Walkers looking for maximum intensity can try using resistance cords (which are similar to a retractable dog leash) attached to a belt. In Porcari’s study, people who pulled the cords back and forth while walking boosted their heart rate by 27-44 beats per minute compared to regular walkers.
Ankle weights are not as effective as hand or wrist weights in burning calories, and could put added stress on your knees, Porcari says. Wearing a weighted vest is not the best option either; a 150-pound person would have to carry a 60-pound vest for a significant cardiovascular benefit, and that amount of weight would put undue stress on your ankle, knees and hips, Porcari says.
If you want a more challenging walk without using equipment, increase your speed and try going up and down hills, says Porcari. "Most people get a workout from walking 3-4.5 miles per hour," he says.
If you walk briskly on a regular schedule, you’ll strengthen your heart, reduce your blood pressure and increase the efficiency of your heart and lungs, says The President’s Council on Physical Fitness and Sports. A study in the New England Journal of Medicine found that women who walked one to three hours a week were 30 percent less likely to develop heart disease or suffer a heart attack compared with sedentary women. Walking is a safe, low-cost activity that can be done anywhere and burns about the same number of calories per mile as jogging, Porcari says.
"For a long time, the benefits of walking have been underestimated," Porcari says. "Before you had to exercise intensely to get any benefit. Now studies show you just have to be moderately active most days of the week. You don’t have to go out and run every day of the week."
Heart Attack Warning Signs
   Uncomfortable pressure, fullness, squeezing or pain in the center of the chest lasting more than a few minutes.
   Pain spreading to the shoulders, neck or arms.
   Chest discomfort with lightheadedness, fainting, sweating, nausea or shortness of breath.
Source: American Heart Association
Stroke Warning Signs
   Sudden numbness or weakness of the face, arm or leg, especially on one side of the body.
   Sudden confusion, trouble speaking or understanding.
   Sudden trouble seeing in one or both eyes.
   Sudden trouble walking, dizziness, loss of balance or coordination.
   Sudden, severe headache with no known cause.
Source: American Stroke Association
It. s an all-too-familiar scenario. Too often, people delay going to the hospital . waiting hours sometimes . before they seek help for what is a life-and-death emergency. Every second counts in a heart attack. Cardiologists say the longer the delay, the greater the chance of damage to the heart, the lower the chance of surviving.
More than half of all coronary heart disease deaths in America take place before victims reach the hospital, according to the National Heart Attack Alert Program (NHAAP), which is a part of the National Institutes of Health. s National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. And mortality rates for sudden-out-of-hospital cardiac arrest run as high as 99 percent in some communities.






























    





  

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Here are some new techniques and ideas for lesson plans and web pages that will serve as a valuable resource for the upcoming school year. It is  site that will help teachers create lessons, browse other subject areas and share knowledge with other teachers . There is a lesson template and creator that are easy to perform and include in our curriculum guidelines. This kind of help will keep us abreast of new information and keep our subject area a viable means of public relations to other teachers , parents and community . It can be found at the following site:
http://www.kiko.com/index.jsp

Filamentality - EASY, online, interactive webquest creator!


Filamentality is a fill-in-the-blank interactive Web site that guides you through picking a topic, searching the Web, gathering good Internet sites, and turning Web resources into learning activities. It helps combine the "filaments" of the Web with a learner's "mentality". Support is built-in through Mentality Tips that guide you along the way to creating a Web-based activity you can share with others even if you don't know anything about HTML, Web servers, or all that www-dot stuff.
  What Exactly Does this Filamentality Do?
Maybe it doesn't slice, dice, or chop--but Filamentality does blend your learning goals with the many resources available on the Web. How does Filamentality do it? By guiding you through the complete instructional design process. Okay, okay, we'll tell you in plain English: Filamentality helps you pick a topic, provides Web searching tips, lets you use "fill-in-the-blanks" to gather good Internet sites, guides you with interactive pages that help you shape your ideas around whatever specific goal you have, and then, presto change-o, gives you your very own Web page .
By using the links will guide the teacher to formats for easy web page design. It can be found at :
http://www.mikids.com/teacher.html

Using the Internet to Enhance Learning(Web Quest examples)
EXAMPLES by JOHN WILLIAMS who facilitates online courses for the local community college.
You can get to the lessons by clicking the Class lessons link on the left
The lessons are:
A Healthy Heart Topic: Cardiovascular Health (on that page)
Find the Pieces for a Healthy Diet (under archives Fall 1998)
and
Helpful Internet Resources ( an EXSS Webquest ) (summer 1999)
I thought this might be a way to show some examples of plans done through
online teaching and as a web quest example.
http://www-coned.pitt.cc.nc.us/ctc/jw/utitel.htm




NEW P.E. ARTICLE


Despite tumbles and collisions - the kids wear helmets and protective gear - Gordon and her classmates said they'd rather learn skating in PE class than play flag football or softball. "We actually want to do this," said Lexi Sack, 16. "It's an easy way to exercise."
With kids getting more sedentary and obesity among children and adults now a national health concern, schools all over the country have started offering skating, aerobics, power-walking and mountain biking.
The aim is not only to get kids interested in gym class, with its dreaded uniforms and team-picking that agonized the less athletically inclined kids, but to train them in physical activities that will keep them from becoming the next generation of couch potatoes.
Some physical educators call it "The New PE."
"We are trying to bridge that gateway from the school environment to living a healthy lifestyle when they leave school," said Mary Marks, health and physical education coordinator for Fairfax County public schools in northern Virginia, which has revamped its physical education program to emphasize lifetime fitness. "We hope that kids will like the activities and continue on in their adult life."
A dramatic rise in childhood obesity - 10 percent to 15 percent of American kids are overweight or obese, double the number in 1980 - has occurred as many states have dropped requirements that kids take gym class every day, as recommended by the U.S. surgeon general.
Only 21 percent of adolescents are taking one or more gym classes a week, according to a recent University of North Carolina study that said gym class cutbacks were partly to blame for the rise in overweight kids.
Illinois is the only state that still requires daily gym class and four years of PE for high schoolers. Virginia requires two years; many states require just one year of PE to graduate and let kids in band or ROTC slide.
Even in Illinois, schools can get around the requirement. Nineteen percent of the state's 895 school districts have received waivers for the daily requirement to devote more time for other classes or because they don't have proper facilities for PE classes.
Under pressure to improve test scores, school officials say they have to cut back on gym to free up class time for math, reading and other core subjects. Chicago public school officials wanted to reduce PE requirements to two years for high schoolers.
"People were asking, 'Do our kids need to be playing or studying?"' said Tom Hernandez, spokesman for the state education board.
Experts say a decline in mandatory PE classes is just one of many factors contributing to the problem of overweight kids. Computer games and TV keep kids indoors; busy parents with no time to cook rely on fast or prepared foods that are loaded with fat; kids left alone after school are filling up on junk food, and children in high-crime areas stay away from neighborhood playgrounds.
"These are all changes that have occurred simultaneously with the epidemic," said William Dietz, CDC's nutrition and physical activity czar.
Kids who don't get enough exercise could be at greater risk for diabetes, heart disease and other ailments, so teaching them to stay active when they're young is important to staving off health problems later in life, says Fairfax County's Marks.
The importance of physical education has even gotten the attention of lawmakers in Congress. Several are pushing to add a $400 million grant program to expand and improve PE in public schools to an education funding bill now before Congress.
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9/5/2000
“…but I don’t want to be selfish!” objected the woman
who had just been told to exercise regularly by her doctor.
She was making the common mistake of confusing selfish-
ness with self-care.

What is the difference? Selfishness is not caring how
you affect others. It is taking something for yourself and
disregarding the needs of others. It is the attitude, “I'll do
what I want, be what I want,” and not think about the other
people. In an effort to avoid being selfish, some people
mistakenly sacrifice their needs, end up being martyrs and
feel resentful.

Self-care is caring for yourself so you have the emotional,
physical and spiritual resources to care for others. Taking
care of yourself means you exercise and workout, so you
have the good health and energy to care for your family,
friends and community. Self-care means you exercise to
protect your good health, so your family has less risk of
dealing with your being sick. Self-care sets a good example
for your loved ones, especially your children. Self-care says,
“I am important, too.”

Your life is busy and there are many demands on you. It
takes thought and awareness to appropriate your time,
money and energy, so that everyone gets their needs met
as often as possible. Just make sure that you are included
with “everyone”. Put your fitness high enough on the “to do”
list that you get to exercise at least 3 times a week.

Take care of yourself.

W32/Navidad@M is an Internet worm that spreads using the
Windows email program Outlook. McAfee AVERT has given it a
risk assessment of MEDIUM-ON WATCH, due to a significant
increase in infection levels worldwide.

The email can come from addresses that you will recognize.
Attached is a file named NAVIDAD.EXE and when it is run, it
displays a dialog box entitled, "Error" which reads "UI". A
blue eye icon then appears in the system tray next to the
clock in the lower right corner of the screen, and a copy of
the worm is saved to the file "winsvrc.vxd" in the WINDOWS
SYSTEM directory.

If your PC becomes infected with the W32/Navidad@M worm, all
subsequent emails addressed to you will be responded to
automatically with an email from your address with the
W32/Navidad@M worm as an attachment.

TIMING IS IMPORTANT
You may think you're reducing calories but
skipping meals is an unhealthy practice that
can actually sabotage your attempts to control
or lose weight.

Try not to go more than four hours between eating.
Keep healthy snacks handy to tide you over between
meals and prevent overeating later.

Spreading your calorie intake evenly throughout
the day also helps normalize and maintain blood sugar
levels - helping you keep your energy even, eliminating
frequent headaches, and keeping you mentally on your toes.

~*~ ~*~ ~*~ ~*~ ~*~ ~*~ ~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~
"Continuous effort - not strength or intelligence - is
the key to unlocking our potential."
-- Winston Churchill
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~*~Food tip of the week ~*~

WINTER WARM UP
Try chunky tomato-basil soup to warm you up
on a cold day.

1 cupanned stewed tomatoes, diced
(reserve one-half cup of the liquid)
one half cup canned tomatoe paste
one fourth cup vegetable broth
two tablespoons chopped fresh basil
salt and pepper to taste

Combine all incredients, heat and serve.
110 calories per cup
Makes two 1-cup servings












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Materials Needed: Real Player Software, School or Home PC
Description of Show Motion Presentation
The presentation is a free software program from the Tripod Homepage that may be viewed from a URL site made available on a teacher or school homepage. The Show Motion program can be utilized with text, scanned images, snapshots and videos that has a slide show format. The student/parent view the slides with the Real Player program.
Each text slide will inform the viewer of a skill, technique or any information pertinent to a developmentally appropriate activity. A caption may be added to explain the slide. A scanned image may be added to capture students in action in an individual or group setting. A video slide will reinforce the text, scanned or snapshot images. Background music can be added to instill a professional demonstration. This presentation can be a valuable public relations tool to inform the community of an exemplary P.E. program. Each month a new slide program can highlight the activities that are covered during the school year. Also, it can be used on Parent/Teacher nights, during PTA programs, in-service days and can be useful in displaying homework or long distance learning for those children who are ill, special need students or for use as an integrated activity to share with other schools, teachers and students around the world.
The presentation is a prepared script that has the capability to include the students as presenters to accrue Internet technology skills and may peak the interest of those students who may be unwilling participants in regular physical activity.
To learn more and to see an actual demonstration visit at the following URL:
http://igreen.tripod.com/presentations/KiskiArea/index.html

http://igreen.tripod.com/presentations/myschoolstuff/index.html

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  Top 10 Diet Foods
Your Top 10 'Must-Have' Foods For Healthy Living, Weight Loss:
Brought to you by ediets

1. Oats. The b-glucan in whole oats reduces the risk of coronary heart disease. The soluble fiber is vital in lowering cholesterol and stabilizing blood sugars.

2. Soybeans. The bioactive ingredients in soy products suppress formation of blood vessels that feed cancer cells. Soy helps stabilize hormone levels in women, as well as decrease the risk of heart disease, osteoporosis, and ovarian, breast, and prostate cancer.

3. Tomatoes. Lycopene, a potent antioxidant, is a carotenoid that fights the uncontrolled growth of cells into tumors. It fights cancer of the colon, bladder, pancreas and prostate.

4. Cold Water Seafood. Healthy EPA/omega-3 oils are shown to turn on fat oxidation, decrease risk of coronary artery disease, stabilize blood sugars, increase brainpower, and reduce inflammatory response. Seafood reduces "bad" LDL cholesterol and triglycerides, while raising levels of "good" HDL cholesterol.

5. Flaxseed. A unique source of lignans, powerful antioxidants that are believed to stop cells from turning cancerous. Flaxseed also contains alpha-linolenic acid, the plant version of the omega-3s found in fish oils. It makes a great healthy option for people who don't eat fish.
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6. Garlic. Rich in allicin, which boosts immune function and reduces cancer risk, garlic also has strong anti-viral effects and has been shown to lower blood pressure and cholesterol levels.

7. Hot Peppers. A source of capsaicin, a vital immune, mood and metabolic booster with powerful anti-viral effects. Capsaicin is linked to decreased risk of stomach cancer due to its ability to neutralize nitrosamines, a cancer-causing compound formed in the body when cured or charred meats are consumed. Capsaicin also kills bacteria believed to cause stomach ulcers... and appears to turn on the fat-burning capacity.

8. Sweet Potatoes. A rival of carrots as a potent source of beta-carotene and other carotenoids, which help prevent cataracts and protect the body from free radicals and cancer -– particularly cancer of the larynx, esophagus, and lungs.

9. Grapes. Grape skins contain a high concentration of resveratrol, which appears to block the formation of coronary artery plaque, as well as tumor formation and growth. Red grape juice or red wine is considered a better source of resveratrol than white, which are made without the grape skins.

10. Cruciferous Vegetables. Broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, and brussels sprouts contain indoles, sulforaphane, and isothiocyanates, which protect cells from damage by carcinogens, block tumor formation, and help the liver to inactivate hormone-like compounds that may promote cancer.
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FLY TO THIS NEW UPDATE

For all techies out there try this new free phone call program from MSN Messenger Service. It is a fre downoad with capabilities of free phone calls in the U.S. and Canada. It can be found at the following URL: http://www.msn.com and when you get there click on the left pane(messenger service 3.0) Along the same lines with free calls around the WORLD try http://www.hottelephone.com whcih is also a free service. And those who don't have a separate phone line try http://www.callwave.com for an Internet answering machine that will cost around 2.00 dollars a month. It will alert a voice message that will be heard through your speakers. And without leaving the Internet - call using the MSN- to complete the communication . You will need a microphone to traverse the conversation .
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